Funding Economic Development and the Role of National Development Banks

The Case of Cyprus

Helen Kavvadia & Savvakis C. Savvides

Published: September 2020


Prior to its privatisation in 2008, the Cyprus Development Bank played an important role in the economic development of Cyprus, intermediating international finance from multilateral development banks. This function was subsequently undertaken by commercial banks, which are currently limited by balance-sheet fatigue, however, and lack necessary elements for successfully executing this role. Our analysis shows a current void of institutional capacity in funding growth-bearing projects. Proceeding in a normative way, we recommend reinstalling a development finance agency that will tackle the issues by swapping equity for debt relief.



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